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“…and then I woke up.” at the Audacity Solo Salon!

Monday night, December 8th, I performed a 20 minute selection from my solo show “…and then I woke up.” at the Audacity Solo Salon at the Margo Jones Theater in Fair Park, Dallas. The evening was hosted by Audacity Theatre Lab boss Brad McEntire, and featured performances by Brad and local writer/performer Adam A. Anderson.

I don't need no freaking script! The thing on the music stand is my Zoom audio recorder. We filmed the performance.
I don’t need no freaking script! The thing on the music stand is my Zoom audio recorder. We filmed the performance.

The evening was awesome! Brad opened with a selection from his solo show Cyrano A-Go-Go, the story of his entry into the theatrical world through Edmond Rostand’s play about the man with the big nose.

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Adam then gave his spoken word performance The Creation of an Asshole. It was dazzling. Rhythmic, rhyming, and brilliant.

Left to right: Adam A. Anderson, Brad McEntire & me!
Left to right: Adam A. Anderson, Brad McEntire & me!

Finally, it was my turn. Unfortunately, I was in the process of losing my voice and had somehow neglected to take some water up on stage with me. Nonetheless, the performance went very well. There were plenty of laughs, and the notes I got were things that would be corrected in the context of the full show. In that, performing only 20 minutes of a 60 minute show means there are some references that don’t quite make sense unless you’ve seen the first part of the show. But, that part has been workshopped to the point of being finely tuned. This middle bit was getting its first real spin outside of a classroom. Had to see what it could do, and came away happy.

The full show should be on display soon! Watch this space.

Dallas Morning News names “A Very Nouveau Holiday” as one of the Top 5 shows to see this weekend!

N47HolidayFBookBanner

Opening tomorrow, A Very Nouveau Holiday, of which my show Playing Santa is a part, was named by Dallas Morning News theater critic Nancy Churnin as one of the Top 5 shows to see in Dallas this weekend! Don’t miss it!

http://artsblog.dallasnews.com/2014/12/five-top-theater-picks-with-a-little-help-from-the-nouveau-holiday-elves.html/

“Playing Santa” – Two guys, dressed in the iconic red suit, are waiting at an audition to play Santa Claus. How exactly does one audition to play Santa? Come see the hilarious results for yourself!

My performances are specifically on Thursday and Saturday for the next two weekends (11th, 13th, 18th & 20th).

See the link for details.

https://www.facebook.com/events/375880529237000/?ref_newsfeed_story_type=regular&pnref=story

Photo by Robert Hart www.roberthart.com
Photo by Robert Hart
http://www.roberthart.com

BIG, BIG, BIG NEWS!!!! (coming soon)

Hello, everyone!

I got some very big news today concerning my show “…and the I woke up.”

I can’t share the details yet, but I will soon.

In short, though, you’ll all have an opportunity to see the show in the near future!

Until then, you can get a preview of what’s to come on Monday, December 8th at the Audacity Solo Salon!

audacity solo salon

Check the link for more details: https://www.facebook.com/events/1732977533594481/?ref_dashboard_filter=upcoming

Hard at work, preparing for a week of performances…

Soon…

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RSVP here…

Audacity Solo Salon (12/8/14): https://www.facebook.com/events/1732977533594481/?ref=2&ref_dashboard_filter=upcoming

A Very Nouveau Holiday Show (12/11-12/21/14): https://www.facebook.com/events/375880529237000/?ref_dashboard_filter=upcoming

A Very Nouveau Holiday Show! (Featuring me!)

Photo by Robert Hart www.roberthart.com
Photo by Robert Hart
http://www.roberthart.com

On December 11, 13, 18 & 20, I’ll be performing, alongside my good friend Lance Lusk, an original short play called “Playing Santa” at A Very Nouveau Holiday Show at the Margo Jones Theater in Fair Park.

N47HolidayPoster

But, it’s not just Lance and me! Oh, no. It’s an entire evening of awesome short plays from some of the area best playwrights. We’re talking Brad McEntire and Ben Schroth up in here!

So, please go to the link below and RSVP. It should be a super fun show.

But note: I’m only performing on Thursdays and Saturdays. If you come on Friday or Sunday, I won’t be there. But, if that’s the only day you can go, you still should.

Ho, Ho, Ho, everyone!!!

https://www.facebook.com/events/409596222521296/?ref_dashboard_filter=upcoming

The cigar band collage mosaics of Kim Jackson…

I wanted to take a minute to introduce everyone to my good friend and super talented artist, Kim Jackson.

http://www.kjackart.com

Especially if you’re looking for an awesome holiday or birthday gift.

Photo by Robert Hart www.roberthart.com
Photo by Robert Hart
http://www.roberthart.com

18″ x 24″ on canvas board

She’s a talented artist in many respects. You should see her on stage acting. Amazing.

But, she also works in visual art and her current work is nothing short of amazing.

Photo by Robert Hart www.roberthart.com
Photo by Robert Hart
http://www.roberthart.com

This Hitchock is actually for sale. It’s 36″ x 60″ on masonite. $6,000

Visit her website for more info and to contact her.

http://www.kjackart.com

It all started when she made me this piece for my birthday…

Photo by Robert Hart www.roberthart.com
Photo by Robert Hart
http://www.roberthart.com

18″ x 24″ on cardboard

There are made of 100% cigar bands. Even the fine details. It’s really amazing. I’ve watched her work and it’s mesmerizing. The amount of talent and attention to detail that goes in to each piece is mind boggling. Multiple artists have attested that they’d never be able to do the same thing. It takes a high level of technical skill, a dizzying attention to detail, and an pretty singular vision. It’s really impressive.

Photo by Robert Hart www.roberthart.com
Photo by Robert Hart
http://www.roberthart.com

18″ x 24″ on canvas board

And the best part? She does commissions!

Looking for that perfect holiday or birthday present?

Visit her website!

http://www.kjackart.com

“Playing Santa” by Kris Noteboom at A Very Nouveau Holiday Show!!

Photo by Robert Hart www.roberthart.com
Photo by Robert Hart
http://www.roberthart.com

I’ve had a play accepted to the 2nd Annual A Very Nouveau Holiday Show, at the Margo Jones Theater in Dallas’ Fair Park!

The piece is called ‘Playing Santa’ and takes the form of a Vaudevillian double act in the vein of Abbott Costello, with some Didi and Gogo thrown in for good existential measure.

Playing opposite me is the very talented Lance Lusk.

Watch us as we debate how best to audition for an play Santa, why we’re doing it, and what exactly it means. It’s a fun piece. And we wear Santa outfits!

Of course, this show is part of a larger evening of short plays by some of the Dallas/Ft. Worth area’s most talented writers. Come see pieces by Ben Schroth, Brad McEntire, and others.

The full run of the event is December 11th – 21st, with performances at 8:00 on Thursday through Saturday, and 2:15 on Sundays.

However, my show is only playing on Thursday and Friday nights. The 11th, 13th, 18th & 20th.

So, there are only four opportunities to see my show in particular.

Make your reservations early. It should be a fun evening.

Here’s the link to my Facebook Event page, which everyone should be able to RSVP to.

Facebook Event

Here is reservation info from Nouveau:

“Performances are at the historic Margo Jones Theater in the Magnolia Lounge at Fair Park (1121 1st Ave. Dallas, TX). Tickets are $15, and the box office for this event can be reached by email at n47holiday@gmail.com or by leaving a message at (469) 573-1747”

So, email n47holiday@gmail.com or call (469) 573-1747

Hope to see you all there!!

I’m performing at the Audacity Solo Salon in December!!!

I’l be performing two times (for a total of five actual performances) in the month of December.

audacity solo salon

First, come see me at the Audacity Solo Salon on December 8th.

This is the second Solo Salon after its debut in August of this year. On this particular night, I’ll be featured alongside Adam A. Anderson and Brad McEntire, two incredibly talented performers who I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing many times in my other life as a theater critics.

My performance will be a 20 minute selection from my solo show “..and then I woke up”.

This is a workshop type atmosphere where each of us will take turns performing, followed by audience feedback. It’s a really cool chance to see what’s on the Horizon in the Dallas theater scene.

The location is the Margo Jones Theatre in Fair Park.

Also, it’s free!!!

Show starts at 7:30.

Email me for more info. Also, here’s a link to my Facebook event page. All are welcome.

Facebook Event Page

And the website for the Audacity Solo Salon

Performance Installation: Week 4

Our reading for the week was the book Essay on the Blurring of Art and Life, a book of Allan Kaprow’s writings about his work edited by Jeff Kelley.

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My original reflection on the reading…

I’ve had experience studying Kaprow before, in Performance Art and Performance Theory classes during my masters.

Kaprow’s signature contribution to art is the Happening. 

Happenings are tough to define, partly because Kaprow’s own definition shifted over time. Basically, they’re a art performance or installation that happens outside the bounds of the traditional art sphere (i.e. galleries, theaters, etc.) 

That’s really broad. Winnowing down, Kaprow was concerned with the question, “What is art?” His solution partly involved taking the elements of what makes art, consciously, art, and instead using everyday locations, objects, and actions to challenge the perception of art itself. Starting with more scripted events, Kaprow eventually got to a point where events only happened once, they weren’t promoted, and there was a chance the people participating in them weren’t even aware of their intentions, meanings, etc. To Kaprow, art was the actual creation and execution of art. Not necessarily the creations themselves or the spaces they’re contained in. 

I’ve been a part of happenings before, typically of the more scripted variety where the audience was aware of their participation. 

And what this reading does for me is raise the topic of the conscious versus the subconscious. 

Once we’re conscious of something, we automatically assign culturally curated symbolism, meaning, and definition to it. As such, people in a gallery will behave the way people in a gallery are “supposed” to behave, and they’ll automatically register the gallery’s contents as “art”, because that’s what’s in a gallery. 

By leaving the safe confines of the curated, controlled space, Kaprow was able to get a more honest, perhaps visceral reaction from his audience, which in a way, is art. 

I remember taking a class on Dada and Surrealist art at the Nasher Sculpture Center. One time in class, I made the, tired, statement that art is subjective. My professor, a curator at the center, corrected me. She said, our reaction to art is subjective. 

Such a small change in the statement makes a big difference. It acknowledges that something is art if we call it art, taking the power away from the art academy and placing it squarely on the spectator. And there’s something to that. Think of things we interact with everyday. A chair, a table, a toilet (Hello, Duchamp!). All of these things had to be designed. They are, in their own way, art. But, because they exist in our everyday lives, and perhaps because they serve very practical purposes, we don’t immediately identify them as being artistic. The Dadas and Surrealists plead their own part in challenging these notions. Duchamp’s readymades specifically did this. Especially his work Fountain, a urinal turned on its back and signed, as a work of art would be. 

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Collage and some of the Dada sculpture would also fall into this category.

But, Kaprow took that a step further. After all, a lot of these Dada and Surrealist works were still displayed in galleries and exhibitions where they were defined as art. Kaprow took his art outside of the gallery, noting in the book that in order to get to the heart of what is art, you had to un-art the art, or basically strip it of the signifiers that identified it as art. So, take it out of the gallery, don’t sign it, don’t advertise it as art. Just let it happen, as it were. 

This, in turn, will elicit a spontaneous, unconscious reaction from the audience, which can then reveal the true definition and nature of art. 

I totally dig what Kaprow is saying, to an extent. We live in a socially constructed world and follow script throughout our everyday lives. So, when someone walks into a theater or a gallery, they’re playing the role of audience member, art patron, etc. Due to these roles that we take on, we behave in certain ways, and look at the contents in a certain way. We perceive the art as art simply because we’re in a place that houses art. Not necessarily because it actually is art. Confused yet?

I like the idea of getting your audience into an unconscious space. Getting them to react spontaneously and authentically to art really is, perhaps, one of the most interesting aspects of art.

However, what the Dadas and Surrealists played a big role in starting, and what Kaprow furthered, is this postmodern notion of deconstruction. And while there is a way in which deconstruction can be a very good thing, what happens at the end when we’ve torn the entire academy down?

By deconstructing the notion of “What is art?”, we tear it down to its parts to such an extent that we invite a total relativistic outlook on the form as a whole that in the search for meaning can dilute it to the point that it has no meaning.

As Hakim Bey suggested in TAZ: Go into the lobby of a Citibank, drop your pants, take a shit on the floor, and walk out.

Sure, you can identify that as an artistic expression. Especially in today’s world where there is such distrust of the large banks. But, if no one else knows about it, is it art? Is it enough that the 20 people in the bank perceived the action and questioned in their own heads what it meant?

I agree that we should find ways to break down the social scripts that can, arguably, sometimes limit art. But, how far can we break them down before there is no script left? Are we truly living in an age that’s so subjective that it’s enough if just one person unconsciously perceives it as art? 

And think of it on a practical level. It’s fine when you’re the one leading the charge on these movements, but what happens to artists who come after? I feel it’s safe to say that the world needs art and artists. But, we let those who came before us tear down the academy to a point that we’ve entered into a time of cynicism where everything is considered trite or derivative. Everything is been there, done that. 

Kaprow was great, but he got to work in a time when the art world was still somewhat strong, so his abstraction meant something. But, his development of the Happening, in a way, can play as him pulling the pin on a grenade on his way out the door and making it more difficult for everyone who comes after him. The grand narrative (or meta narrative) of art has been broken down to a point that to participate in the traditional art world these days is considered tired. As Tom Riccio said to me during a meeting, “Theater is dead.” (For this example, consider that theater can mean art in general). Now, Tom didn’t mean that theater itself is dead. That’s obviously not true. Broadway posted record ticket sales last year. What he meant is the “box” is dead. The traditional theater, with its proscenium seating and coherent, self-contained narratives, is dead. To participate in this old form is to be living in the past, to an extent. 

I, in all my amateurism, disagree. I think it’s still possible to work within the box (whether that be a theater, a gallery, or whatever else) and create great, progressive art. The key, as Kaprow’s work gets at, is getting the audience to truly unconsciously react to the art within. How to do that? I’m not totally sure. But, I’ll keep working on it.

I know going into this class, that Tom is a fan of site specific artistic work. His group, Dead White Zombies specializes in site specific performance. And, I think it’s really cool and results in really visceral, honest performances. I like the notion. And it’s something I want to do with my work. Which leads me to the assignment (etude) for the week…

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